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1 : A earthworm of the genus Lumbricus, frequently used by anglers for bait. See Earthworm.

2 : A lepidopterous insect, which in the larval state often travels in great multitudes from field to field, destroying grass, grain, and other crops. The common army worm of the northern United States is Leucania unipuncta. The name is often applied to other related species, as the cotton worm.

3 : The larva of a small two-winged fly (Sciara), which marches in large companies, in regular order. See Cotton worm, under Cotton.

4 : A peculiar transparent worm of the genus Sagitta, living at the surface of the sea. See Sagitta.

5 : A disease of hawks. See Filanders.

6 : One of several lepidopterous insects which construct, in the larval state, a baglike case which they carry about for protection. One species (Platoeceticus Gloveri) feeds on the orange tree. See Basket worm.

7 : A small, burrowing, snakelike, limbless lizard (Anguis fragilis), with minute eyes, popularly believed to be blind; the slowworm; -- formerly a name for the adder.

8 : The larva of a moth (Heliothis armigera) which devours the bolls or unripe pods of the cotton plant, often doing great damage to the crops.

9 : Any larva of a beetle or moth, which is injurious to books. Many species are known.

10 : A student closely attached to books or addicted to study; a reader without appreciation.

11 : A caddice. See Caddice.

12 : The larva of two species of geometrid moths which are very injurious to fruit and shade trees by eating, and often entirely destroying, the foliage. Other similar larvae are also called cankerworms.

13 : A worm or grub that makes for itself a case. See Caddice.

14 : An insect that turns about nimbly; the mole cricket; -- called also fan cricket.

15 : The teredo; -- so called because it injures the bottoms of vessels, where not protected by copper.

16 : The ringworm.

17 : A caterpillar which at night eats off young plants of cabbage, corn, etc., usually at the ground. Some kinds ascend fruit trees and eat off the flower buds. During the day, they conceal themselves in the earth. The common cutworms are the larvae of various species of Agrotis and related genera of noctuid moths.

18 : See Earthworm.

19 : The larva of any geometrid moth, which drops from trees by means of a thread of silk, as the cankerworm.

20 : Any worm of the genus Lumbricus and allied genera, found in damp soil. One of the largest and most abundant species in Europe and America is L. terrestris; many others are known; -- called also angleworm and dewworm.

21 : A mean, sordid person; a niggard.

22 : The larva of a small tortricid moth which eats the leaves of the cranberry, so that the vines look as if burned; -- called also cranberry worm.

23 : A worm or grub found among flags and sedge.

24 : Any worm belonging to the Plathelminthes; also, sometimes applied to the planarians.

25 : Same as 1st Fluke, 2.

26 : A chilognath myriapod of the genus Iulus, and allied genera, having numerous short legs along the sides; a milliped or "thousand legs." See Chilognatha.

27 : The parasitic worm that causes the gapes in birds. See Illustration in Appendix.

28 : A coleopterous insect of the genus Lampyris; esp., the wingless females and larvae of the two European species (L. noctiluca, and L. splendidula), which emit light from some of the abdominal segments.

29 : The aquatic larva of a gnat; -- called also, colloquially, wiggler.

30 : The fluke of sheep. See Fluke.

31 : See Grub, n., 1.

32 : The larva or grub of a large South American beetle (Calandra palmarum), which lives in the pith of palm trees and sugar cane. It is eaten by the natives, and esteemed a delicacy.

33 : A nematoid worm of the genus Gordius, resembling a hair. See Gordius.

34 : The larva of a botfly.

35 : The larva of any geometrid moth. See Geometrid.

36 : The larva of a small, hymenopterous fly (Eurytoma hordei), which is found in gall-like swellings on the stalks of wheat, usually at or just above the first joint. In some parts of America it does great damage to the crop.

37 : The lugworm.

38 : A large marine annelid (Arenicola marina) having a row of tufted gills along each side of the back. It is found burrowing in sandy beaches, both in America and Europe, and is used for bait by European fishermen. Called also lobworm, and baitworm.

39 : Any one of several species of parasitic nematoid worms which infest the lungs and air passages of cattle, sheep, and other animals, often proving fatal. The lungworm of cattle (Strongylus micrurus) and that of sheep (S. filaria) are the best known.

40 : A tippler.

41 : Any intestinal worm found in the stomach, esp. the common round worm (Ascaris lumbricoides), and allied species.

42 : One of the larvae of botflies of horses; a bot.

43 : A larva or grub that lives in muck or manure; -- applied to the larvae of the tumbledung and allied beetles.

44 : One who scrapes together money by mean labor and devices; a miser.

45 : Any hairy caterpillar which appears in great numbers, devouring herbage, and wandering about like a palmer. The name is applied also to other voracious insects.

46 : In America, the larva of any one of several moths, which destroys the foliage of fruit and forest trees, esp. the larva of Ypsolophus pometellus, which sometimes appears in vast numbers.

47 : The teredo.

48 : Any myriapod of the genus Iulus and allied genera which rolls up spirally; a galleyworm. See Illust. under Myriapod.

49 : A small nematoid worm (Oxyurus vermicularis), which is parasitic chiefly in the rectum of man. It is most common in children and aged persons.

50 : A contagious affection of the skin due to the presence of a vegetable parasite, and forming ring-shaped discolored patches covered with vesicles or powdery scales. It occurs either on the body, the face, or the scalp. Different varieties are distinguished as Tinea circinata, Tinea tonsurans, etc., but all are caused by the same parasite (a species of Trichophyton).

(50) words is found which contain worm in our database

For worm word found data is following....

1 : Angleworm

n.

A earthworm of the genus Lumbricus, frequently used by anglers for bait. See Earthworm.

2 : Army worm

A lepidopterous insect, which in the larval state often travels in great multitudes from field to field, destroying grass, grain, and other crops. The common army worm of the northern United States is Leucania unipuncta. The name is often applied to other related species, as the cotton worm.

3 : Army worm

The larva of a small two-winged fly (Sciara), which marches in large companies, in regular order. See Cotton worm, under Cotton.

4 : Arrowworm

n.

A peculiar transparent worm of the genus Sagitta, living at the surface of the sea. See Sagitta.

5 : Backworm

n.

A disease of hawks. See Filanders.

6 : Bagworm

n.

One of several lepidopterous insects which construct, in the larval state, a baglike case which they carry about for protection. One species (Platoeceticus Gloveri) feeds on the orange tree. See Basket worm.

7 : Blindworm

n.

A small, burrowing, snakelike, limbless lizard (Anguis fragilis), with minute eyes, popularly believed to be blind; the slowworm; -- formerly a name for the adder.

8 : Bollworm

n.

The larva of a moth (Heliothis armigera) which devours the bolls or unripe pods of the cotton plant, often doing great damage to the crops.

9 : Bookworm

n.

Any larva of a beetle or moth, which is injurious to books. Many species are known.

10 : Bookworm

n.

A student closely attached to books or addicted to study; a reader without appreciation.

11 : Cadeworm

n.

A caddice. See Caddice.

12 : Cankerworm

n.

The larva of two species of geometrid moths which are very injurious to fruit and shade trees by eating, and often entirely destroying, the foliage. Other similar larvae are also called cankerworms.

13 : Caseworm

n.

A worm or grub that makes for itself a case. See Caddice.

14 : Churrworm

n.

An insect that turns about nimbly; the mole cricket; -- called also fan cricket.

15 : Copperworm

n.

The teredo; -- so called because it injures the bottoms of vessels, where not protected by copper.

16 : Copperworm

n.

The ringworm.

17 : Cutworm

n.

A caterpillar which at night eats off young plants of cabbage, corn, etc., usually at the ground. Some kinds ascend fruit trees and eat off the flower buds. During the day, they conceal themselves in the earth. The common cutworms are the larvae of various species of Agrotis and related genera of noctuid moths.

18 : Dewworm

n.

See Earthworm.

19 : Dropworm

n.

The larva of any geometrid moth, which drops from trees by means of a thread of silk, as the cankerworm.

20 : Earthworm

n.

Any worm of the genus Lumbricus and allied genera, found in damp soil. One of the largest and most abundant species in Europe and America is L. terrestris; many others are known; -- called also angleworm and dewworm.

21 : Earthworm

n.

A mean, sordid person; a niggard.

22 : Fireworm

n.

The larva of a small tortricid moth which eats the leaves of the cranberry, so that the vines look as if burned; -- called also cranberry worm.

23 : Flagworm

n.

A worm or grub found among flags and sedge.

24 : Flatworm

n.

Any worm belonging to the Plathelminthes; also, sometimes applied to the planarians.

25 : Flukeworm

n.

Same as 1st Fluke, 2.

26 : Galley-worm

n.

A chilognath myriapod of the genus Iulus, and allied genera, having numerous short legs along the sides; a milliped or "thousand legs." See Chilognatha.

27 : Gapeworm

n.

The parasitic worm that causes the gapes in birds. See Illustration in Appendix.

28 : Glowworm

n.

A coleopterous insect of the genus Lampyris; esp., the wingless females and larvae of the two European species (L. noctiluca, and L. splendidula), which emit light from some of the abdominal segments.

29 : Gnatworm

n.

The aquatic larva of a gnat; -- called also, colloquially, wiggler.

30 : Gourdworm

n.

The fluke of sheep. See Fluke.

31 : Grubworm

n.

See Grub, n., 1.

32 : Grugru worm

The larva or grub of a large South American beetle (Calandra palmarum), which lives in the pith of palm trees and sugar cane. It is eaten by the natives, and esteemed a delicacy.

33 : Hairworm

A nematoid worm of the genus Gordius, resembling a hair. See Gordius.

34 : Horseworm

n.

The larva of a botfly.

35 : Inchworm

n.

The larva of any geometrid moth. See Geometrid.

36 : Jointworm

n.

The larva of a small, hymenopterous fly (Eurytoma hordei), which is found in gall-like swellings on the stalks of wheat, usually at or just above the first joint. In some parts of America it does great damage to the crop.

37 : Lobworm

n.

The lugworm.

38 : Lugworm

n.

A large marine annelid (Arenicola marina) having a row of tufted gills along each side of the back. It is found burrowing in sandy beaches, both in America and Europe, and is used for bait by European fishermen. Called also lobworm, and baitworm.

39 : Lungworm

n.

Any one of several species of parasitic nematoid worms which infest the lungs and air passages of cattle, sheep, and other animals, often proving fatal. The lungworm of cattle (Strongylus micrurus) and that of sheep (S. filaria) are the best known.

40 : Maltworm

n.

A tippler.

41 : Mawworm

n.

Any intestinal worm found in the stomach, esp. the common round worm (Ascaris lumbricoides), and allied species.

42 : Mawworm

n.

One of the larvae of botflies of horses; a bot.

43 : Muckworm

n.

A larva or grub that lives in muck or manure; -- applied to the larvae of the tumbledung and allied beetles.

44 : Muckworm

n.

One who scrapes together money by mean labor and devices; a miser.

45 : Palmerworm

n.

Any hairy caterpillar which appears in great numbers, devouring herbage, and wandering about like a palmer. The name is applied also to other voracious insects.

46 : Palmerworm

n.

In America, the larva of any one of several moths, which destroys the foliage of fruit and forest trees, esp. the larva of Ypsolophus pometellus, which sometimes appears in vast numbers.

47 : Pileworm

n.

The teredo.

48 : Pillworm

n.

Any myriapod of the genus Iulus and allied genera which rolls up spirally; a galleyworm. See Illust. under Myriapod.

49 : Pinworm

n.

A small nematoid worm (Oxyurus vermicularis), which is parasitic chiefly in the rectum of man. It is most common in children and aged persons.

50 : Ringworm

n.

A contagious affection of the skin due to the presence of a vegetable parasite, and forming ring-shaped discolored patches covered with vesicles or powdery scales. It occurs either on the body, the face, or the scalp. Different varieties are distinguished as Tinea circinata, Tinea tonsurans, etc., but all are caused by the same parasite (a species of Trichophyton).

This word worm uses (4) total characters with white space

This word worm uses (4) total characters with white out space

This word worm uses 4 unique characters: M O R W

Number of all permutations npr for worm word is (24)

Number of all combination ncr for worm word is (24)

Similar matching soundex word for worm

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3 same character containing word For worm

4 same character containing word For worm

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From Wikipedia

Worms
Regenwurm1.jpg
Lumbricus terrestris, the common earthworm
Scientific classification
Kingdom:Animalia
Subkingdom:Eumetazoa
(unranked):Bilateria
Phyla
  • Annelida (segmented worms)
  • Arthropoda (inchworms, sometimes called "canker worms")
  • Chaetognatha (arrow worms)
  • Gnathostomulid (jaw worms)
  • Hemichordata (acorn/tongue worms)
  • Nematoda (roundworms)
  • Nematomorpha (horsehair worms)
  • Nemertea (ribbon worms)
  • Onychophora (velvet worms)
  • Phoronida (horseshoe worms)
  • Platyhelminthes (flatworms)
  • Priapulida (phallus worms)
  • Sipuncula (peanut worms)
White tentacles of Eupolymnia crasscornis below red sea urchin in Kona, Hawaii

Worms /ˈwɜːrm/ are many different distantly related animals that typically have a long cylindrical tube-like body and no limbs. Worms vary in size from microscopic to over 1 metre (3.3 ft) in length for marine polychaete worms (bristle worms),[1] 6.7 metres (22 ft) for the African giant earthworm, Microchaetus rappi,[2] and 58 metres (190 ft) for the marine nemertean worm (bootlace worm), Lineus longissimus.[3] Various types of worm occupy a small variety of parasitic niches, living inside the bodies of other animals. Free-living worm species do not live on land, but instead live in marine or freshwater environments, or underground by burrowing. In biology, "worm" refers to an obsolete taxon, vermes, used by Carolus Linnaeus and Jean-Baptiste Lamarck for all non-arthropod invertebrate animals, now seen to be paraphyletic. The name stems from the Old English word wyrm. Most animals called "worms" are invertebrates, but the term is also used for the amphibian caecilians and the slowworm Anguis, a legless burrowing lizard. Invertebrate animals commonly called "worms" include annelids (earthworms and marine polychaete or bristle worms), nematodes (roundworms), platyhelminthes (flatworms), marine nemertean worms ("bootlace worms"), marine Chaetognatha (arrow worms), priapulid worms, and insect larvae such as grubs and maggots.

Worms may also be called helminths, particularly in medical terminology when referring to parasitic worms, especially the Nematoda (roundworms) and Cestoda (tapeworms) which reside in the intestines of their host. When an animal or human is said to "have worms", it means that it is infested with parasitic worms, typically roundworms or tapeworms. Lungworm is also a common parasitic worm found in various animal species such as fish and cats.

  1. ^ "Cornwall – Nature – Superstar Worm". BBC. 
  2. ^ Keely Parrack (21 June 2005) "The Mighty Worm". Worm Digest.[dead link]
  3. ^ Mark Carwardine (1995) The Guinness Book of Animal Records. Guinness Publishing. p. 232.

From Wiktionary

See also: Worm, WORM, and Wörm

Contents

  • 1 English
    • 1.1 Etymology
    • 1.2 Pronunciation
    • 1.3 Noun
      • 1.3.1 Usage notes
      • 1.3.2 Derived terms
      • 1.3.3 Translations
      • 1.3.4 References
    • 1.4 Verb
      • 1.4.1 Translations
    • 1.5 See also
    • 1.6 References
    • 1.7 Anagrams
  • 2 Cornish
    • 2.1 Adjective
  • 3 Dutch
    • 3.1 Alternative forms
    • 3.2 Etymology
    • 3.3 Pronunciation
    • 3.4 Noun
      • 3.4.1 Derived terms
      • 3.4.2 See also
  • 4 Portuguese
    • 4.1 Etymology
    • 4.2 Pronunciation
    • 4.3 Noun

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English worm, werm, wurm, wirm, from Old English wyrm (snake, worm), from Proto-Germanic *wurmiz, from Proto-Indo-European *wr̥mis, possibly from *wer- (to turn). Cognate with Dutch worm, West Frisian wjirm, German Wurm, Danish orm. Indo-European cognates include Latin vermis (worm), Lithuanian var̃mas (insect, midge), Albanian rrime (rainworm), Ancient Greek ῥόμος (rhómos, woodworm). First computer usage by John Brunner in his 1975 book The Shockwave Rider.

Doublet of wyrm, which is a fairly recent borrowing directly from the Old English.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /wɜːm/
  • (US) enPR: wûrm, IPA(key): /wɝm/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)m
A worm

Noun[edit]

worm (plural worms)

  1. A generally tubular invertebrate of the annelid phylum; an earthworm.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 7, in The China Governess[1]:
      ‘Children crawled over each other like little grey worms in the gutters,’ he said. ‘The only red things about them were their buttocks and they were raw. Their faces looked as if snails had slimed on them and their mothers were like great sick beasts whose byres had never been cleared. […]’
  2. More loosely, any of various tubular invertebrates resembling annelids but not closely related to them, such as velvet worms, acorn worms, flatworms, or roundworms.
  3. (archaic) A type of wingless "dragon", especially a gigantic sea serpent.[1]
  4. (fantasy, science fiction) Either a mythical "dragon" (especially wingless),[2] a gigantic sea serpent, or a creature that resembles a Mongolian death worm.[3]
  5. A contemptible or devious being.
    Don't try to run away, you little worm!
    • 1611, King James Version of the Bible, Psalms 22:6,[2]
      But I am a worm, and no man; a reproach of men, and despised of the people.
  6. (computing) A self-replicating program that propagates through a network.
  7. (cricket) A graphical representation of the total runs scored in an innings.
  8. Anything helical, especially the thread of a screw.
    • Moxon
      The threads of screws, when bigger than can be made in screw plates, are called worms.
    1. A spiral instrument or screw, often like a double corkscrew, used for drawing balls from firearms.
    2. The spiral wire of a corkscrew.
    3. (anatomy) A muscular band in the tongue of some animals, such as dogs; the lytta.
    4. The condensing tube of a still, often curved and wound to save space.
    5. A short revolving screw whose threads drive, or are driven by, a worm wheel or rack by gearing into its teeth.
  9. (obsolete) Any creeping or crawling animal, such as a snake, snail, or caterpillar.
    • 1561, Geneva Bible, Acts 28:3-4,[3]
      And when Paul had gathered a nomber of stickes, & laid them on the fyre, there came a viper out of the heat, and leapt on his hand. Now when the Barbarians sawe the worme hang on his hand, they said among them selues This man surely is a murtherer, whome, thogh he hathe escaped the sea, yet Vengeance hathe not suffred to liue.
    • c. 1609, William Shakespeare, Cymbeline, Act III, Scene 4,[4]
      [] No, ’tis slander,
      Whose edge is sharper than the sword, whose tongue
      Outvenoms all the worms of Nile []
    • 1867, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (translator), The Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri, Boston: Ticknor & Fields, Volume I, Inferno, Canto 6, lines 22-24, p. 35,[5]
      When Cerberus perceived us, the great worm!
      His mouth he opened and displayed his tusks;
      Not a limb had he that was motionless.
  10. (figuratively) An internal tormentor; something that gnaws or afflicts one’s mind with remorse.
    • c. 1592, William Shakespeare, Richard III, Act I, Scene 3,[6]
      The worm of conscience still begnaw thy soul!
  11. (mathematics) A strip of linked tiles sharing parallel edges in a tiling.
  12. (anatomy) The lytta.

Usage notes[edit]

Although the use of the "worm" to mean "dragon" or "serpent" is archaic, those meanings are in current use in the word "wyrm" which is a doublet of "worm". Wyrm is a fairly recent borrowing directly from the Old English.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sea serpent at Wikipedia
  2. ^ Dragon (Middle-earth) at Wikipedia
  3. ^ Sandworm (Dune) at Wikipedia

Verb[edit]

worm (third-person singular simple present worms, present participle worming, simple past and past participle wormed)

  1. (transitive) To make (one's way) with a crawling motion.
    We wormed our way through the underbrush.
  2. (intransitive) To move with one's body dragging the ground.
    • 1919, William Joseph Long, How animals talk: and other pleasant studies of birds and beast‎
      Inch by inch I wormed along the secret passageway, flat to the ground, not once raising my head, hardly daring to pull a full breath [].
  3. (intransitive, figuratively) To work one's way by artful or devious means.
    • George Herbert (1593-1633)
      When debates and fretting jealousy / Did worm and work within you more and more, / Your colour faded.
  4. (transitive, figuratively) To work (one's way or oneself) (into) gradually or slowly; to insinuate.
    He wormed his way into the organization
  5. To effect, remove, drive, draw, or the like, by slow and secret means; often followed by out.
    • Jonathan Swift (1667–1745)
      They find themselves wormed out of all power.
  6. (transitive, figuratively, in “worm out of”) To drag out of, to get information that someone is reluctant or unwilling to give (through artful or devious means or by pleading or asking repeatedly). Often combined with expressions such as "It's like pulling teeth" or "It's like getting blood out of a stone".
    • Charles Dickens (1812-1870)
      They [] wormed things out of me that I had no desire to tell.
    • 1913, Mrs. [Marie] Belloc Lowndes, chapter XXII, in The Lodger, London: Methuen, OCLC 7780546; republished in Novels of Mystery: The Lodger; The Story of Ivy; What Really Happened, New York, N.Y.: Longmans, Green and Co., 55 Fifth Avenue, [1933], OCLC 2666860, page 1738:
      He nodded. "Mum's the word, Mrs. Bunting! It'll all be in the last editions of the evening newspapers—it can't be kep' out. There'd be too much of a row if twas!" ¶ "Are you going off to that public-house now?" she asked. ¶ "I've got a awk'ard job—to try and worm something out of the barmaid."
  7. (transitive, nautical) To fill in the contlines of (a rope) before parcelling and serving.
    Worm and parcel with the lay; turn and serve the other way.
    • 1841, Benjamin J. Totten, Naval Text-Book:
      Ropes [] are generally wormed before they are served.
  8. (transitive) To deworm (an animal).
  9. (transitive) To cut the worm, or lytta, from under the tongue of (a dog, etc.) for the purpose of checking a disposition to gnaw, and formerly supposed to guard against canine madness.
    • Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832)
      The men assisted the laird in his sporting parties, wormed his dogs, and cut the ears of his terrier puppies.
  10. (transitive) To clean by means of a worm; to draw a wad or cartridge from, as a firearm.

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

  • caterpillar
  • grub
  • lumbricine
  • maggot
  • Trojan horse
  • vermian
  • vermiform
  • virus

References[edit]

  • [7] The Free Dictionary, Farlex Inc., 2010.

Anagrams[edit]

  • mrow

Cornish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

worm

  1. Soft mutation of gorm.

Dutch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • wurm

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch *wurm, *worm, from Proto-Germanic *wurmiz, from Proto-Indo-European *wr̥mis. Compare English worm, West Frisian wjirm, German Wurm, Danish orm.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Rhymes: -ɔrm
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

worm m (plural wormen, diminutive wormpje n)

  1. worm

Derived terms[edit]

  • aasworm
  • haringworm
  • hazelworm
  • lintworm
  • oorworm
  • regenworm
  • ringworm

See also[edit]

  • pier

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English worm.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈwoʁ.mi/

Noun[edit]

worm m (plural worms)

  1. (computer security) worm (self-replicating program)