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1 : One of the sessile cirripeds; a barnacle of the genus Balanus. See Barnacle.

2 : A species of shell (Cypraea argus), beautifully variegated with spots resembling those in a peacock's tail.

3 : A marine bivalve shell belonging to the genus Arca and its allies.

4 : A marine gastropod of the genus Crepidula. The species are numerous. It is so named from its form and interior deck.

5 : A marine univalve shell of the genus Cymba.

6 : A bomb. See Bomb, n.

7 : A marine univalve shell of the genus Bulla and allied genera, belonging to the Tectibranchiata.

8 : One of the shells or valves of a cockle.

9 : A light boat.

10 : A machine that separates the kernels of corn from the cob.

11 : A flattened marine univalve shell of the genus Haliotis; -- called also sea-ear. See Abalone.

12 : The shell or exterior covering of an egg. Also used figuratively for anything resembling an eggshell.

13 : A smooth, white, marine, gastropod shell of the genus Ovulum, resembling an egg in form.

14 : A marine univalve shell of the genus Pyrula, or Ficula, resembling a fig in form.

15 : One of numerous species of marine gastropod shells, belonging to Ranella and allied genera.

16 : A large, handsome, marine, univalve shell (Triton femorale).

17 : A sharp-edged, tubular, marine shell, of the genus Vermetus; also, the pinna. See Vermetus.

18 : Unyielding; insensible to argument; uncompromising; strict.

19 : of Hatchel

20 : of Hatchel

21 : The place of the dead, or of souls after death; the grave; -- called in Hebrew sheol, and by the Greeks hades.

22 : The place or state of punishment for the wicked after death; the abode of evil spirits. Hence, any mental torment; anguish.

23 : A place where outcast persons or things are gathered

24 : A dungeon or prison; also, in certain running games, a place to which those who are caught are carried for detention.

25 : A gambling house.

26 : A place into which a tailor throws his shreds, or a printer his broken type.

27 : To overwhelm.

28 : A judge or umpire in games or combats.

29 : A large North American aquatic salamander (Protonopsis horrida or Menopoma Alleghaniensis). It is very voracious and very tenacious of life. Also called alligator, and water dog.

30 : Born in or of hell.

31 : Produced in hell.

32 : Prepared in hell.

33 : A composition for infernal purposes; a magical preparation.

34 : A witch; a hag.

35 : The dabchick.

36 : Doomed to hell.

37 : A genus of perennial herbs (Helleborus) of the Crowfoot family, mostly having powerfully cathartic and even poisonous qualities. H. niger is the European black hellebore, or Christmas rose, blossoming in winter or earliest spring. H. officinalis was the officinal hellebore of the ancients.

38 : Any plant of several species of the poisonous liliaceous genus Veratrum, especially V. album and V. viride, both called white hellebore.

39 : A poisonous glucoside accompanying helleborin in several species of hellebore, and extracted as a white crystalline substance with a bittersweet taste. It has a strong action on the heart, resembling digitalin.

40 : A poisonous glucoside found in several species of hellebore, and extracted as a white crystalline substance with a sharp tingling taste. It possesses the essential virtues of the plant; -- called also elleborin.

41 : The practice or theory of using hellebore as a medicine.

42 : A native of either ancient or modern Greece; a Greek.

43 : Of or pertaining to the Hellenes, or Greeks.

44 : Of or pertaining to the Hellenes, or inhabitants of Greece; Greek; Grecian.

45 : The dialect, formed with slight variations from the Attic, which prevailed among Greek writers after the time of Alexander.

46 : A phrase or form of speech in accordance with genius and construction or idioms of the Greek language; a Grecism.

47 : The type of character of the ancient Greeks, who aimed at culture, grace, and amenity, as the chief elements in human well-being and perfection.

48 : One who affiliates with Greeks, or imitates Greek manners; esp., a person of Jewish extraction who used the Greek language as his mother tongue, as did the Jews of Asia Minor, Greece, Syria, and Egypt; distinguished from the Hebraists, or native Jews (Acts vi. 1).

49 : One skilled in the Greek language and literature; as, the critical Hellenist.

50 : Alt. of Hellenistical

(50) words is found which contain hell in our database

For hell word found data is following....

1 : Acorn-shell

n.

One of the sessile cirripeds; a barnacle of the genus Balanus. See Barnacle.

2 : Argus shell

A species of shell (Cypraea argus), beautifully variegated with spots resembling those in a peacock's tail.

3 : Ark shell

A marine bivalve shell belonging to the genus Arca and its allies.

4 : Boat shell

A marine gastropod of the genus Crepidula. The species are numerous. It is so named from its form and interior deck.

5 : Boat shell

A marine univalve shell of the genus Cymba.

6 : Bombshell

n.

A bomb. See Bomb, n.

7 : Bubble shell

A marine univalve shell of the genus Bulla and allied genera, belonging to the Tectibranchiata.

8 : Cockleshell

n.

One of the shells or valves of a cockle.

9 : Cockleshell

n.

A light boat.

10 : Cornsheller

n.

A machine that separates the kernels of corn from the cob.

11 : Ear-shell

n.

A flattened marine univalve shell of the genus Haliotis; -- called also sea-ear. See Abalone.

12 : Eggshell

n.

The shell or exterior covering of an egg. Also used figuratively for anything resembling an eggshell.

13 : Eggshell

n.

A smooth, white, marine, gastropod shell of the genus Ovulum, resembling an egg in form.

14 : Fig-shell

n.

A marine univalve shell of the genus Pyrula, or Ficula, resembling a fig in form.

15 : Frogshell

n.

One of numerous species of marine gastropod shells, belonging to Ranella and allied genera.

16 : Goroon shell

A large, handsome, marine, univalve shell (Triton femorale).

17 : Gougeshell

n.

A sharp-edged, tubular, marine shell, of the genus Vermetus; also, the pinna. See Vermetus.

18 : Hard-shell

a.

Unyielding; insensible to argument; uncompromising; strict.

19 : Hatchelled

of Hatchel

20 : Hatchelling

of Hatchel

21 : Hell

v. t.

The place of the dead, or of souls after death; the grave; -- called in Hebrew sheol, and by the Greeks hades.

22 : Hell

v. t.

The place or state of punishment for the wicked after death; the abode of evil spirits. Hence, any mental torment; anguish.

23 : Hell

v. t.

A place where outcast persons or things are gathered

24 : Hell

v. t.

A dungeon or prison; also, in certain running games, a place to which those who are caught are carried for detention.

25 : Hell

v. t.

A gambling house.

26 : Hell

v. t.

A place into which a tailor throws his shreds, or a printer his broken type.

27 : Hell

v. t.

To overwhelm.

28 : Hellanodic

n.

A judge or umpire in games or combats.

29 : Hellbender

n.

A large North American aquatic salamander (Protonopsis horrida or Menopoma Alleghaniensis). It is very voracious and very tenacious of life. Also called alligator, and water dog.

30 : Hellborn

a.

Born in or of hell.

31 : Hellbred

a.

Produced in hell.

32 : Hellbrewed

a.

Prepared in hell.

33 : Hellbroth

n.

A composition for infernal purposes; a magical preparation.

34 : Hell-cat

n.

A witch; a hag.

35 : Hell-diver

n.

The dabchick.

36 : Helldoomed

a.

Doomed to hell.

37 : Hellebore

n.

A genus of perennial herbs (Helleborus) of the Crowfoot family, mostly having powerfully cathartic and even poisonous qualities. H. niger is the European black hellebore, or Christmas rose, blossoming in winter or earliest spring. H. officinalis was the officinal hellebore of the ancients.

38 : Hellebore

n.

Any plant of several species of the poisonous liliaceous genus Veratrum, especially V. album and V. viride, both called white hellebore.

39 : Helleborein

n.

A poisonous glucoside accompanying helleborin in several species of hellebore, and extracted as a white crystalline substance with a bittersweet taste. It has a strong action on the heart, resembling digitalin.

40 : Helleborin

n.

A poisonous glucoside found in several species of hellebore, and extracted as a white crystalline substance with a sharp tingling taste. It possesses the essential virtues of the plant; -- called also elleborin.

41 : Helleborism

n.

The practice or theory of using hellebore as a medicine.

42 : Hellene

n.

A native of either ancient or modern Greece; a Greek.

43 : Hellenian

a.

Of or pertaining to the Hellenes, or Greeks.

44 : Hellenic

a.

Of or pertaining to the Hellenes, or inhabitants of Greece; Greek; Grecian.

45 : Hellenic

n.

The dialect, formed with slight variations from the Attic, which prevailed among Greek writers after the time of Alexander.

46 : Hellenism

n.

A phrase or form of speech in accordance with genius and construction or idioms of the Greek language; a Grecism.

47 : Hellenism

n.

The type of character of the ancient Greeks, who aimed at culture, grace, and amenity, as the chief elements in human well-being and perfection.

48 : Hellenist

n.

One who affiliates with Greeks, or imitates Greek manners; esp., a person of Jewish extraction who used the Greek language as his mother tongue, as did the Jews of Asia Minor, Greece, Syria, and Egypt; distinguished from the Hebraists, or native Jews (Acts vi. 1).

49 : Hellenist

n.

One skilled in the Greek language and literature; as, the critical Hellenist.

50 : Hellenistic

a.

Alt. of Hellenistical

This word hell uses (4) total characters with white space

This word hell uses (4) total characters with white out space

This word hell uses 3 unique characters: E H L

Number of all permutations npr for hell word is (6)

Number of all combination ncr for hell word is (6)

Similar matching soundex word for hell

2 same character containing word for hell

3 same character containing word For hell

4 same character containing word For hell

All permutations word for hell

All combinations word for hell

All similar letter combinations related to hell

From Wikipedia

Medieval illustration of Hell in the Hortus deliciarum manuscript of Herrad of Landsberg (about 1180)
Hell - detail from a fresco in the medieval church St. Nicolas in Raduil, Bulgaria
Painting representing hell in the Church of Debra Berhan Selassie, Gondar, Ethiopia

Hell, in many religious and folkloric traditions, is a place or state of torment and punishment in an afterlife. Religions with a linear divine history often depict hells as eternal destinations while religions with a cyclic history often depict a hell as an intermediary period between incarnations. Typically these traditions locate hell in another dimension or under the Earth's surface and often include entrances to Hell from the land of the living. Other afterlife destinations include Heaven, Purgatory, Paradise, and Limbo.

Other traditions, which do not conceive of the afterlife as a place of punishment or reward, merely describe hell as an abode of the dead, the grave, a neutral place located under the surface of Earth (for example, see Sheol and Hades).

From Wiktionary

See also: he'll and Hell

Contents

  • 1 English
    • 1.1 Alternative forms
    • 1.2 Pronunciation
    • 1.3 Etymology 1
      • 1.3.1 Proper noun
        • 1.3.1.1 Synonyms
        • 1.3.1.2 Antonyms
        • 1.3.1.3 Translations
      • 1.3.2 Noun
        • 1.3.2.1 Derived terms
        • 1.3.2.2 Translations
      • 1.3.3 Interjection
        • 1.3.3.1 Translations
        • 1.3.3.2 See also
    • 1.4 Etymology 2
      • 1.4.1 Verb
        • 1.4.1.1 References
    • 1.5 Etymology 3
      • 1.5.1 Verb
        • 1.5.1.1 References
  • 2 Albanian
    • 2.1 Etymology
    • 2.2 Noun
  • 3 Cornish
    • 3.1 Noun
  • 4 Estonian
    • 4.1 Etymology
    • 4.2 Adjective
      • 4.2.1 Declension
  • 5 German
    • 5.1 Etymology
    • 5.2 Pronunciation
    • 5.3 Adjective
      • 5.3.1 Declension
      • 5.3.2 Antonyms
      • 5.3.3 Derived terms
    • 5.4 Further reading
  • 6 Luxembourgish
    • 6.1 Etymology
    • 6.2 Pronunciation
    • 6.3 Adjective
      • 6.3.1 Declension
  • 7 Norwegian
    • 7.1 Noun
  • 8 Norwegian Bokmål
    • 8.1 Verb
  • 9 Old English
    • 9.1 Etymology
    • 9.2 Pronunciation
    • 9.3 Noun
      • 9.3.1 Derived terms
      • 9.3.2 Descendants

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:
hell
Wikipedia

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Christianity): Hell
  • hel (17th century)
  • helle

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: hĕl, IPA(key): /hɛl/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛl

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English helle, from Old English hel, hell, helle (nether world, abode of the dead, hell), from Proto-Germanic *haljō (nether world, concealed place), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱel- (to cover, conceal, save). Cognate with Saterland Frisian Hälle (hell), German Low German Hell (hell), Dutch hel (hell), German Hölle (hell), Swedish helvete (hell), Icelandic hel (the abode of the dead, death). Also related to the Hel of Germanic mythology. See also hele.

Proper noun[edit]

hell

  1. In various religions, the place where some or all spirits are believed to go after death
    Some religious people believe that all the followers of the other religions go to hell.
  2. (Abrahamic religions, uncountable) The place where devils live and where sinners suffer after death
    May you rot in hell!
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost
      Better to reign in Hell than serve in Heaven.
    • 1916, James Joyce, Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
      Hell is a strait and dark and foul-smelling prison, an abode of demons and lost souls, filled with fire and smoke.
Synonyms[edit]
  • See Thesaurus:afterlife
Antonyms[edit]
  • (in Abrahamic religions, uncountable): heaven
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

hell (countable and uncountable, plural hells)

  1. (countable, hyperbolic) A place or situation of great suffering in life.
    My new boss is making my job a hell.
    I went through hell to get home today.
    • 1879, General William T. Sherman, commencement address at the Michigan Military Academy
      There is many a boy here today who looks on war as all glory, but, boys, it is all hell.
    • 1986, Metallica (music), “Disposable Heroes”, in Master of Puppets:
      Why, am I dying? / Kill, have no fear / Lie, live off lying / Hell, hell is here
  2. (countable) A place for gambling.
    • W. Black
      a convenient little gambling hell for those who had grown reckless
    • 1907, Joseph Conrad, The Secret Agent
      [] the air of moral nihilism common to keepers of gambling hells and disorderly houses; []
  3. An extremely hot place.
    You don't have a snowball's chance in hell.
  4. Used as an intensifier in phrases grammatically requiring a noun
    I'm as mad as hell and I'm not going to take it any more.
    What the hell is wrong with you?!
    He says he's going home early? Like hell he is.
  5. (obsolete) A place into which a tailor throws his shreds, or a printer his broken type.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Hudibras to this entry?)
  6. In certain games of chase, a place to which those who are caught are carried for detention.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Interjection[edit]

hell

  1. (impolite, sometimes considered vulgar) Used to express discontent, unhappiness, or anger.
    Oh, hell! I got another parking ticket.
  2. (impolite, sometimes considered vulgar) Used to emphasize.
    Hell, yeah!
  3. (impolite, sometimes considered vulgar) Used to introduce an intensified statement following an understated one; nay; not only that, but.
    [Do it, or, r]est assured, there will be no more Middle Eastern crisis – hell, there will be no more Middle East!
Translations[edit]
See also[edit]
  • damn
  • heck

Etymology 2[edit]

From German hellen (to brighten, burnish). Related to Dutch hel (clear, bright) and German hell (clear, bright).

Verb[edit]

hell (third-person singular simple present hells, present participle helling, simple past and past participle helled)

  1. (rare, metal-working) To add luster to, burnish (silver or gold).
    • G. Smith (1799)
      To hell gold or gilt workː take two ounces of tartar, two ounces of sulfur.. and it will give it a fine luster.
References[edit]
  • A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old Norse hella (to pour). Cognate with Icelandic hella (to pour), Norwegian helle (to pour), Swedish hälla (to pour). See also hield.

Verb[edit]

hell (third-person singular simple present hells, present participle helling, simple past and past participle helled)

  1. (rare) To pour.
    • Harvest (1821)
      Gosh, the sickle went into me handː Down hell'd the blood.
References[edit]
  • A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles

Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Albanian *skōla, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kol- (stake); compare Lithuanian kuõlas, Polish kóɫ, Ancient Greek σκύλος (skúlos).

Noun[edit]

hell m

  1. skewer
  2. spear
  3. icicle

Cornish[edit]

Noun[edit]

hell

  1. Aspirate mutation of kell.

Estonian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Of Finnic origin. Cognate to Finnish hellä and Votic ellä.

Adjective[edit]

hell (genitive hella, partitive hella)

  1. tender, gentle

Declension[edit]


German[edit]

FWOTD – 3 September 2014

Etymology[edit]

Cognate with Dutch hel.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /hɛl/
  • (file)
  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

hell (comparative heller, superlative am hellsten)

  1. clear, bright, light
    • 1918, Elisabeth von Heyking, Die Orgelpfeifen, in: Zwei Erzählungen, Phillipp Reclam jun. Verlag, page 9:
      So dunkel und schauerlich die Gruft aussah, wenn man durch die blinden, bestaubten Scheibchen der kleinen Fenster hineinblickte, so hell und freundlich war oben die Kirche.
      Just as dark and eerie the crypt looked like, if one looked in it through the cloudy, dusted little panes of the small windows, as bright and friendly was the church above.

Declension[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

  • dunkel

Derived terms[edit]

  • hellhörig
  • hellsichtig

Further reading[edit]

  • hell in Duden online

Luxembourgish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German hel. Cognate with German helle, Dutch hel.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /hæl/
  • Rhymes: -æl
  • Homophone: Häll

Adjective[edit]

hell (masculine hellen, neuter hellt, comparative méi hell, superlative am hellsten)

  1. clear, bright
  2. light, pale

Declension[edit]


Norwegian[edit]

Noun[edit]

hell n

  1. luck

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Verb[edit]

hell

  1. imperative of helle

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *haljō, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ḱel- (to cover, hide, conceal). Cognate with Old Frisian helle, hille, Old Saxon hel, hellia, Old Dutch hella, Old High German hella, hellia, Old Norse hel, Gothic 𐌷𐌰𐌻𐌾𐌰 (halja).

Compare hell, German for "light".

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈhell/

Noun[edit]

hell f

  1. hell

Derived terms[edit]

  • hellewīte

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle English: helle
    • English: hell
    • Scots: hel