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1 : An aquatic herbivorous mammal (Halicore dugong), of the order Sirenia, allied to the manatee, but with a bilobed tail. It inhabits the Red Sea, Indian Ocean, East Indies, and Australia.

2 : A flat saucerlike bell, rung by striking it with a small hammer which is connected with it by various mechanical devices; a stationary bell, used to sound calls or alarms; -- called also gong bell.

3 : An instrument, first used in the East, made of an alloy of copper and tin, shaped like a disk with upturned rim, and producing, when struck, a harsh and resounding noise.

4 : A privy or jakes.

(4) words is found which contain gong in our database

For gong word found data is following....

1 : Dugong

n.

An aquatic herbivorous mammal (Halicore dugong), of the order Sirenia, allied to the manatee, but with a bilobed tail. It inhabits the Red Sea, Indian Ocean, East Indies, and Australia.

2 : Gong

n.

A flat saucerlike bell, rung by striking it with a small hammer which is connected with it by various mechanical devices; a stationary bell, used to sound calls or alarms; -- called also gong bell.

3 : Gong

n.

An instrument, first used in the East, made of an alloy of copper and tin, shaped like a disk with upturned rim, and producing, when struck, a harsh and resounding noise.

4 : Gong

n.

A privy or jakes.

This word gong uses (4) total characters with white space

This word gong uses (4) total characters with white out space

This word gong uses 3 unique characters: G N O

Number of all permutations npr for gong word is (6)

Number of all combination ncr for gong word is (6)

Similar matching soundex word for gong

2 same character containing word for gong

3 same character containing word For gong

4 same character containing word For gong

All permutations word for gong

All combinations word for gong

All similar letter combinations related to gong

From Wikipedia

A gong collection in a gamelan ensemble of instruments – Indonesian Embassy Canberra
An agung, a type of Philippine hanging gong used as part of the Kulintang ensemble

A gong (from Japanese, Indonesian, Malay: gong; Chinese: ; pinyin: luó; Thai: ฆ้อง Khong; Vietnamese: cồng chiêng) is an East and Southeast Asian musical percussion instrument that takes the form of a flat, circular metal disc which is hit with a mallet. The gong traces its roots back to the Bronze Age around 3500 BC. The term 'gong' traces its origins in Java and scientific and archaeological research has established that Burma, China, Java and Annam were the four main gong manufacturing centres of the ancient world.[1] The gong later founds its way into the Western World in the 18th century when it was also used in the percussion section of a Western-style symphony orchestra.[2] Bronze gongs were widely used in ancient Greece and Rome, for instance in the famous Oracle of Dodona.[3][4]

Gongs broadly fall into one of three types: Suspended gongs are more or less flat, circular discs of metal suspended vertically by means of a cord passed through holes near to the top rim. Bossed or nipple gongs have a raised centre boss and are often suspended and played horizontally. Bowl gongs are bowl-shaped, and rest on cushions and belong more to bells than gongs. Gongs are made mainly from bronze or brass but there are many other alloys in use.

Gongs produce two distinct types of sound. A gong with a substantially flat surface vibrates in multiple modes, giving a "crash" rather than a tuned note. This category of gong is sometimes called a tam-tam to distinguish it from the bossed gongs that give a tuned note. In Indonesian gamelan ensembles, some bossed gongs are deliberately made to generate in addition a beat note in the range from about 1 to 5 Hz. The use of the term "gong" for both these types of instrument is common.

  1. ^ Blades, James (1992). Percussion Instruments and Their History. Bold Strummer Ltd. p. 93. ISBN 978-0933224612. 
  2. ^ "Gongs Catalog" (PDF). Paiste. 
  3. ^ Montagu, Jeremy (2007). Origins and Development of Musical Instruments. Scarecrow Press. p. 16–17. ISBN 9780810856578. 
  4. ^ Cook, Arthur Bernard (1902). "The Gong at Dodona". The Journal of Hellenic Studies. 22: 5–28. 

From Wiktionary

See also: Gong, gòng, gông, gōng, göng, gǒng, gọng, and goŋ

Contents

  • 1 English
    • 1.1 Pronunciation
    • 1.2 Etymology 1
      • 1.2.1 Noun
        • 1.2.1.1 Translations
      • 1.2.2 Verb
    • 1.3 Etymology 2
      • 1.3.1 Noun
        • 1.3.1.1 Alternative forms
        • 1.3.1.2 Synonyms
        • 1.3.1.3 Derived terms
    • 1.4 Etymology 3
      • 1.4.1 Noun
    • 1.5 References
  • 2 Dutch
    • 2.1 Etymology
    • 2.2 Noun
  • 3 Indonesian
    • 3.1 Noun
  • 4 Malay
    • 4.1 Etymology
    • 4.2 Noun
  • 5 Mandarin
    • 5.1 Romanization
      • 5.1.1 Usage notes
  • 6 Norwegian Bokmål
    • 6.1 Etymology
    • 6.2 Noun
      • 6.2.1 Synonyms
    • 6.3 References
  • 7 Norwegian Nynorsk
    • 7.1 Pronunciation
    • 7.2 Etymology 1
      • 7.2.1 Noun
      • 7.2.2 See also
    • 7.3 Etymology 2
      • 7.3.1 Noun
        • 7.3.1.1 Synonyms
    • 7.4 References
  • 8 Spanish
    • 8.1 Alternative forms
    • 8.2 Etymology
    • 8.3 Noun
      • 8.3.1 See also

English[edit]

Gong (instrument)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Rhymes: -ɒŋ

Etymology 1[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:
gong
Wikipedia

From Malay gong, possibly onomatopoeia.

Noun[edit]

gong (plural gongs)

  1. (music) A percussion instrument consisting of a metal disk that emits a sonorous sound when struck with a soft hammer.
  2. (Britain, informal) A medal or award.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

gong (third-person singular simple present gongs, present participle gonging, simple past and past participle gonged)

  1. (intransitive) To make the sound of a gong; to ring a gong.
    • 1903, H. G. Wells, The Truth About Pyecraft
      Poor old Pyecraft! He has just gonged, no doubt to order another buttered tea-cake!
  2. (transitive) To halt or disqualify (a contestant in a talent show) by ringing a gong.
    • 1996, Stephanie Holt, ‎Maryanne Lynch, Motherlode
      As she was gonged, host Daryl Somers swept rapidly across and salvaged an embarrassing situation by putting his arm around her and asking her whether she had children.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English gong, from Old English gong, where it was originally a variant of the noun gang (a going, walk, journey, way, etc.),[1] derived from the verb gangan (to go, walk, travel),[2] whose relation to go in Proto-Germanic remains unclear.[3] Doublet of gang.

Noun[edit]

gong (plural gongs)

  1. (obsolete) An outhouse: an outbuilding used as a lavatory.
    • c. 1000, Aelfric, Homilies, Vol. I, p. 290:
      Þaða he to gange com.
    • c. 1400, The Lay Folks Mass Book, Appendix iii, p. 125:
      I knoweleche to the that ther nys no goonge more stynkynge thenne my soule is.
    • a. 1513, Robert Fabyan, New Cronycles of Englande and of Fraunce, Vol. II, p. xxxii:
      The Iewe of Tewkysbury which fell into a Gonge vpon the Satyrday.
    • a. 1577,, George Gascoigne, Grief of Joye, Vol. II, § lxii:
      A stately Toye, a preciows peece of pellfe,
      A gorgeous gong, a worthles painted wall...
  2. (obsolete) The contents of an outhouse pit: shit.
Alternative forms[edit]
  • gang, gonge, goonge, goung, gounge, gung, gunge
Synonyms[edit]
  • (outhouse): gonghouse; see also Thesaurus:bathroom
  • (feces): See Thesaurus:feces
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Mandarin .

Noun[edit]

gong

  1. (uncountable) Cultivation energy
  2. A practice that cultivates such energy.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Oxford English Dictionary. "† gong, n.¹". Oxford University Press (Oxford), 1900.
  2. ^ Oxford English Dictionary. "gang, n."
  3. ^ Oxford English Dictionary. "gang, v.¹" & "go, v."

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Malay gong.

Noun[edit]

gong m (plural gongs, diminutive gongetje n)

  1. gong, disc-shaped metal percussion instrument

Indonesian[edit]

Noun[edit]

gong

  1. (music) a large gong

Malay[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svgThis entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Noun[edit]

gong (plural gong-gong)

  1. a large gong
  2. sound of a gong

Mandarin[edit]

Romanization[edit]

gong

  1. Nonstandard spelling of gōng.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of gǒng.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of gòng.

Usage notes[edit]

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
gong
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Malay gong

Noun[edit]

gong m (definite singular gongen, indefinite plural gonger, definite plural gongene)

  1. (music) a gong (percussion instrument)

Synonyms[edit]

  • gongong

References[edit]

  • “gong” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɡɔŋː/

Etymology 1[edit]

From the verb

Noun[edit]

gong m (definite singular gongen, indefinite plural gonger or gongar, definite plural gongene or gongane)

  1. time
    Kor mange gonger hende det?
    How many times did it happen?

See also[edit]

  • gang (Bokmål)

Etymology 2[edit]

From Malay gong

Noun[edit]

gong m (definite singular gongen, indefinite plural gongar, definite plural gongane)

  1. (music) a gong (percussion instrument)
Synonyms[edit]
  • gongong

References[edit]

  • “gong” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Spanish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • gongo

Etymology[edit]

From Malay gong.

Noun[edit]

gong m (plural gongs)

  1. gong

See also[edit]

  • batintín