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1 : The art or science of cultivating the ground, including the harvesting of crops, and the rearing and management of live stock; tillage; husbandry; farming.

2 : Rearing of bees for their honey and wax.

3 : The cultivation of trees and shrubs, chiefly for timber or for ornamental purposes.

4 : Rearing and care of birds.

5 : The state of being cultivated; result of cultivation; physical improvement; enlightenment and discipline acquired by mental and moral training; civilization; refinement in manners and taste.

6 : The act of, or any labor or means employed for, training, disciplining, or refining the moral and intellectual nature of man; as, the culture of the mind.

7 : The act or practice of cultivating, or of preparing the earth for seed and raising crops by tillage; as, the culture of the soil.

8 : To cultivate; to educate.

9 : of Culture

10 : Characterized by mental and moral training; disciplined; refined; well-educated.

11 : Under culture; cultivated.

12 : Having no culture.

13 : The art of house-keeping, cookery, etc.

14 : The cultivation of flowering plants.

15 : The cultivation of a garden or orchard; the art of cultivating gardens or orchards.

(15) words is found which contain culture in our database

For culture word found data is following....

1 : Agriculture

n.

The art or science of cultivating the ground, including the harvesting of crops, and the rearing and management of live stock; tillage; husbandry; farming.

2 : Apiculture

n.

Rearing of bees for their honey and wax.

3 : Arboriculture

n.

The cultivation of trees and shrubs, chiefly for timber or for ornamental purposes.

4 : Aviculture

n.

Rearing and care of birds.

5 : Culture

n.

The state of being cultivated; result of cultivation; physical improvement; enlightenment and discipline acquired by mental and moral training; civilization; refinement in manners and taste.

6 : Culture

n.

The act of, or any labor or means employed for, training, disciplining, or refining the moral and intellectual nature of man; as, the culture of the mind.

7 : Culture

n.

The act or practice of cultivating, or of preparing the earth for seed and raising crops by tillage; as, the culture of the soil.

8 : Culture

v. t.

To cultivate; to educate.

9 : Cultured

imp. & p. p.

of Culture

10 : Cultured

a.

Characterized by mental and moral training; disciplined; refined; well-educated.

11 : Cultured

a.

Under culture; cultivated.

12 : Cultureless

a.

Having no culture.

13 : Domiculture

n.

The art of house-keeping, cookery, etc.

14 : Floriculture

n.

The cultivation of flowering plants.

15 : Horticulture

n.

The cultivation of a garden or orchard; the art of cultivating gardens or orchards.

This word culture uses (7) total characters with white space

This word culture uses (7) total characters with white out space

This word culture uses 6 unique characters: C E L R T U

Number of all permutations npr for culture word is (720)

Number of all combination ncr for culture word is (720)

Similar matching soundex word for culture

2 same character containing word for culture

3 same character containing word For culture

All permutations word for culture

All combinations word for culture

All similar letter combinations related to culture

From Wikipedia

Social and political organization varies between different cultures.
Celebrations, rituals and patterns of consumption are important aspects of folk culture.
Human symbolic expression developed as prehistoric humans reached behavioral modernity.
Religion and expressive art are important aspects of human culture.

Culture (/ˈkʌlər/) is the social behavior and norms found in human societies. Culture is considered a central concept in anthropology, encompassing the range of phenomena that are transmitted through social learning in human societies. Some aspects of human behavior, social practices such as culture, expressive forms such as art, music, dance, ritual, and religion, and technologies such as tool usage, cooking, shelter, and clothing are said to be cultural universals, found in all human societies. The concept of material culture covers the physical expressions of culture, such as technology, architecture and art, whereas the immaterial aspects of culture such as principles of social organization (including practices of political organization and social institutions), mythology, philosophy, literature (both written and oral), and science comprise the intangible cultural heritage of a society.[1]

In the humanities, one sense of culture as an attribute of the individual has been the degree to which they have cultivated a particular level of sophistication in the arts, sciences, education, or manners. The level of cultural sophistication has also sometimes been seen to distinguish civilizations from less complex societies. Such hierarchical perspectives on culture are also found in class-based distinctions between a high culture of the social elite and a low culture, popular culture, or folk culture of the lower classes, distinguished by the stratified access to cultural capital. In common parlance, culture is often used to refer specifically to the symbolic markers used by ethnic groups to distinguish themselves visibly from each other such as body modification, clothing or jewelry. Mass culture refers to the mass-produced and mass mediated forms of consumer culture that emerged in the 20th century. Some schools of philosophy, such as Marxism and critical theory, have argued that culture is often used politically as a tool of the elites to manipulate the lower classes and create a false consciousness, and such perspectives are common in the discipline of cultural studies. In the wider social sciences, the theoretical perspective of cultural materialism holds that human symbolic culture arises from the material conditions of human life, as humans create the conditions for physical survival, and that the basis of culture is found in evolved biological dispositions.

When used as a count noun, a "culture" is the set of customs, traditions, and values of a society or community, such as an ethnic group or nation. Culture is the set of knowledge acquired over time. In this sense, multiculturalism values the peaceful coexistence and mutual respect between different cultures inhabiting the same planet. Sometimes "culture" is also used to describe specific practices within a subgroup of a society, a subculture (e.g. "bro culture"), or a counterculture. Within cultural anthropology, the ideology and analytical stance of cultural relativism holds that cultures cannot easily be objectively ranked or evaluated because any evaluation is necessarily situated within the value system of a given culture. Yet within philosophy, this stance of cultural relativism is undermined and made inapplicable since such value judgement is itself a product of a given culture.

  1. ^ Macionis, John J; Gerber, Linda Marie (2011). Sociology. Toronto: Pearson Prentice Hall. p. 53. ISBN 9780137001613. OCLC 652430995. 

From Wiktionary

See also: culturé

Contents

  • 1 English
    • 1.1 Etymology
    • 1.2 Pronunciation
    • 1.3 Noun
      • 1.3.1 Derived terms
      • 1.3.2 Related terms
      • 1.3.3 Translations
    • 1.4 Verb
      • 1.4.1 Related terms
      • 1.4.2 Translations
    • 1.5 See also
  • 2 French
    • 2.1 Etymology
    • 2.2 Pronunciation
    • 2.3 Noun
    • 2.4 Further reading
  • 3 Italian
    • 3.1 Pronunciation
    • 3.2 Noun
  • 4 Latin
    • 4.1 Participle
  • 5 Spanish
    • 5.1 Verb

English[edit]

Wikipedia has articles on:
culture
Wikipedia
Commons:Category
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Culture
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Culture

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Culture

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Culture

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Culture

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Etymology[edit]

From Middle French culture (cultivation; culture), from Latin cultūra (cultivation; culture), from cultus, perfect passive participle of colō (till, cultivate, worship) (related to colōnus and colōnia), from Proto-Indo-European *kʷel- (to move; to turn (around)).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈkʌlt͡ʃɚ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈkʌlt͡ʃə/
  • (file)
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

culture (countable and uncountable, plural cultures)

  1. The arts, customs, lifestyles, background, and habits that characterize a particular society or nation.
    • 2013 September 7, “Farming as rocket science”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8852:
      Such differences of history and culture have lingering consequences. Almost all the corn and soyabeans grown in America are genetically modified. GM crops are barely tolerated in the European Union. Both America and Europe offer farmers indefensible subsidies, but with different motives.
  2. The beliefs, values, behaviour and material objects that constitute a people's way of life.
    • 2012 March-April, Jan Sapp, “Race Finished”, in American Scientist, volume 100, number 2, page 164:
      Few concepts are as emotionally charged as that of race. The word conjures up a mixture of associations—culture, ethnicity, genetics, subjugation, exclusion and persecution.
  3. (microbiology) The process of growing a bacterial or other biological entity in an artificial medium; the growth thus produced.
  4. (anthropology) Any knowledge passed from one generation to the next, not necessarily with respect to human beings.
  5. The collective noun for a group of bacteria.
  6. (botany) Cultivation.
    • http://counties.cce.cornell.edu/suffolk/grownet/flowers/sprgbulb.htm
      The Culture of Spring-Flowering Bulbs
  7. (computing) The language and peculiarities of a geographical location.
    A culture is the combination of the language that you speak and the geographical location you belong to. It also includes the way you represent dates, times and currencies.
  8. (cartography) The details on a map that do not represent natural features of the area delineated, such as names and the symbols for towns, roads, meridians, and parallels.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

  • agriculture

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

culture (third-person singular simple present cultures, present participle culturing, simple past and past participle cultured)

  1. (transitive) To maintain in an environment suitable for growth (especially of bacteria).
  2. (transitive) To increase the artistic or scientific interest (in something).

Related terms[edit]

  • cult
  • cultivate
  • culture shock
  • cultural
  • cultural criticism
  • culturally
  • cultured
  • horticulture

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See also[edit]

  • colonus
  • colonia
  • column
  • cycle
  • wheel

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cultūra (cultivation; culture), from cultus, perfect passive participle of colō (till, cultivate, worship), from Proto-Indo-European *kʷel- (to move; to turn (around)).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kyl.tyʁ/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

culture f (plural cultures)

  1. crop
  2. culture (arts, customs and habits)

Further reading[edit]

  • “culture” in le Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Rhymes: -ure

Noun[edit]

culture f

  1. plural of cultura

Latin[edit]

Participle[edit]

cultūre

  1. vocative masculine singular of cultūrus

Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

culture

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of culturar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of culturar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of culturar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of culturar.